Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts etiquetados ‘Estados Unidos’

Originalmente publicado en La Historia Del Día:

Jorge Gómez Barata *
Altercom*

 

 

 
 

Todas las sociedades, en todas las épocas, han tenido en alta estima los méritos militares de sus hijos y muchas veces la carrera de las armas condujo a la política, más rentable y menos peligrosa. Estados Unidos, no son una excepción, necesitó guerras para conquistar territorios, riquezas, posiciones estratégicas, accesos y otros componentes geopolíticos y mantener la hegemonía. Para los imperios, la guerra no es una anomalía, sino un modo de ser.

 

Casi todos los presidentes norteamericanos, a partir de Madison, han tenido al menos una guerrita. McKinley fue el primero en provocar una y Polk lo emuló en México. Abrahán Lincoln condujo la única interna; Wilson rompió el aislacionismo al involucrarse en la primera Guerra Mundial. Roosevelt fue el que más brilló conduciendo al país durante la II Guerra Mundial. Truman protagonizó la mayor matanza sacrificando a Hiroshima, mientras…

Ver original 3.874 palabras más

Read Full Post »

 

The New York Times

 


July 2, 2013

Why the Civil War Still Matters

 

By ROBERT HICKS

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — IN his 1948 novel “Intruder in the Dust,” William Faulkner described the timeless importance of the Battle of Gettysburg in Southern memory, and in particular the moments before the disastrous Pickett’s Charge on July 3, 1863, which sealed Gen. Robert E. Lee’s defeat. “For every Southern boy fourteen years old,” he wrote, “there is the instant when it’s still not yet two o’clock on that July afternoon.”

That wasn’t quite true at the time — as the humorist Roy Blount Jr. reminds us, black Southern boys of the 1940s probably had a different take on the battle. But today, how many boys anywhere wax nostalgic about the Civil War? For the most part, the world in which Faulkner lived, when the Civil War and its consequences still shaped the American consciousness, has faded away.

Which raises an important question this week, as we move through the three-day sesquicentennial of Gettysburg: does the Civil War still matter as anything more than long-ago history?

Fifty years ago, at the war’s centennial, America was a much different place. Legal discrimination was still the norm in the South. A white, middle-class culture dominated society. The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act had not yet rewritten our demographics. The last-known Civil War veteran had died only a few years earlier, and the children and grandchildren of veterans carried within them the still-fresh memories of the national cataclysm.

All of that is now gone, replaced by a society that is more tolerant, more integrated, more varied in its demographics and culture. The memory of the war, at least as it was commemorated in the early 1960s, would seem to have no place.

Obviously, there are those for whom Civil War history is either a profession or a passion, who continue to produce and read books on the war at a prodigious rate. But what about the rest of us? What meaning does the war have in our multiethnic, multivalent society?

For one thing, it matters as a reflection of how much America has changed. Robert Penn Warren called the war the “American oracle,” meaning that it told us who we are — and, by corollary, reflected the changing nature of America.

Indeed, how we remember the war is a marker for who we are as a nation. In 1913, at the 50th anniversary of Gettysburg, thousands of black veterans were excluded from the ceremony, while white Union and Confederate veterans mingled in a show of regional reconciliation, made possible by a national consensus to ignore the plight of black Americans.

Even a decade ago, it seemed as if those who dismissed slavery as simply “one of the factors” that led us to dissolve into a blood bath would forever have a voice in any conversation about the war.

In contrast, recent sesquicentennial events have taken pains to more accurately portray the contributions made by blacks to the war, while pro-Southern revisionists have been relegated to the dustbin of history — a reflection of the more inclusive society we have become. As we examine what it means to be America, we can find no better historical register than the memory of the Civil War and how it has morphed over time.

Then again, these changes also imply that the war is less important than it used to be; it drives fewer passionate debates, and maybe — given that one side of those debates usually defended the Confederacy — that’s a good thing.

But there is an even more important reason the war matters. If the line to immigrate into this country is longer than those in every other country on earth, it is because of the Civil War.

It is true, technically speaking, that the United States was founded with the ratification of the Constitution. And it’s true that in the early 19th century it was a beacon of liberty for some — mostly northern European whites.

But the Civil War sealed us as a nation. The novelist and historian Shelby Foote said that before the war our representatives abroad referred to us as “these” United States, but after we became “the” United States. Somehow, as divided as we were, even as the war ended, we have become more than New Yorkers and Tennesseans, Texans and Californians.

And Gettysburg itself still matters, for the same reason Abraham Lincoln noted so eloquently in his famous address at the site on Nov. 19, 1863. The battle consecrated the “unfinished work” to guarantee “that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

In that way, the Civil War is less important to the descendants of those who fought in it than it is to those whose ancestors were living halfway around the globe at the time. For if you have chosen to throw your lot in with this country, the American Civil War is at the foundation of your reasons to do so.

True, we have not arrived at our final destination as either a nation or as a people. Yet we have much to commemorate. Everything that has come about since the war is linked to that bloody mess and its outcome and aftermath. The American Century, the Greatest Generation and all the rest are somehow born out of the sacrifice of those 750,000 men and boys. None of it has been perfect, but I wouldn’t want to be here without it.

Robert Hicks is the author of the novels “The Widow of the South” and “A Separate Country.”

 

Read Full Post »

AHA

La American Historical Association (AHA), la asociación de historiadores  más antigua y prestigiosa de los Estados Unidos, acaba de reinaugurar su blog AHA Today. Por la variedad de sus contenidos, éste es un recurso muy valioso para aquellos interesados en el estudio e investigación de la historia estadounidense.

 

Read Full Post »

Originalmente publicado en La Historia Del Día:

Dídimo Castillo Fernández. Marco A. Gandásegui, hijo. [Coordinadores]

CLACSO Coedicioneshttp://www.clacso.org.ar/

ISBN 978-607-03-0437-8

CLACSO.  Siglo XXI Editores. Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales/UAEM.

México DF. Noviembre de 2012

 Estados Unidos más alláde la crisis

 

El presente libro, Estados Unidos. Mas allá de la crisis, está integrado por 20 capítulos resultantes de la investigación realizada por el grupo de trabajo Estudios sobre Estados Unidos del Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales (CLACSO). El libro analiza la crisis capitalista actual, su carácter y efectos sobre Estados Unidos, así como sus relaciones con América Latina y el resto del mundo. La recesión, que afectó sobre todo a Estados Unidos, tiene por lo menos dos interpretaciones. La primera, que sostiene que el ciclo económico debe contrarrestarse con políticas que garanticen la recuperación del sector financiero mediante políticas de austeridad. La segunda interpretación de la crisis tiene como eje lo que los analistas consideran el colapso de…

Ver original 202 palabras más

Read Full Post »

Black History Month

188093_113842875308104_6230891_n[1]En Estados Unidos se dedica el mes de febrero a conmemorar y recordar los eventos históricos  y personajes de la comunidad afroamericana. El llamado Black History Month, que se viene celebrando desde la década de 1920,  ha servido para reafirmar la identidad de los afroamericanos, subrayando sus aportaciones, recordando los abusos e injusticias a las que fueron sometidos desde que sus ascentros llegaron encadenados de África y celebrando a sus héroes y mártires. La página web de la American Historical Association nos regala una lista de recursos on-line relacionados con el Black History Month. La lista ha sido recopilada por Jessica Pritchard e incluye una impresionante selección de mapas, documentos, biografías, etc. Comparto con ustedes esta lista de recursos. No puedo dejar de preguntarme si una celebración similar sería posible en el Perú. ¿En Puerto Rico?

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima 9 de febrero de 2013

Read Full Post »

Tapa definitiva Vecinos en conflictoAcabo de leer un libro que me resultó, además de interesante, muy instructivo. Me refiero a Vecinos en conflicto: Argentina y Estados Unidos en las Conferencias Panamericanas (1880-1955). Escrito por Leandro Morgenfeld y publicado en 2011 por Ediciones Continente, Vecinos en conflicto es un estudio concienzudo del desarrollo de las relaciones argentino-estadounidenses desde las últimas décadas del siglo XIX hasta mediados del siglo XX.  Morgenfeld no es un autor ajeno a esta bitácora, pues en octubre pasado compartimos sus comentarios sobre el cincuentenario de la Crisis de los misiles. Doctor en Historia por la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Morgenfeld es, sin lugar a dudas, uno de los analistas latinoamericanos de las relaciones interamericanas más destacados en la actualidad.

Este libro, tesis doctoral de su autor, enfoca el desarrollo de las relaciones argentino-estadounidenses a través de un análisis profundo de la interacción entre ambas naciones en las diez conferencias panamericanas realizadas entre 1889 y 1954.  Según Morgenfeld, durante gran parte de ese periodo, Argentina saboteó o entorpeció los intentos norteamericanos de usar las conferencias panamericanas como herramienta para adelantar sus intereses económicos y geopolíticos en el hemisferio occidental. Este enfrentamiento argentino-norteamericano estuvo definido por varios factores: el carácter competitivo  de las economías argentina y estadounidense, las políticas arancelarias norteamericanas, la orientación europeísta de la Argentina –dada la dependencia de su oligarquía en el mercado británico–, el nacionalismo argentino y las aspiraciones hegemónicas de Estados Unidos.

La extensión y profundidad del análisis de este libro –unidos a la naturaleza de esta bitácora– me obligan a limitar mis comentarios a los puntos más significativos del trabajo de Morgenfeld. Comenzaré con su enfoque teórico.

Leandro-Morgenfeld

Leandro Morgenfeld

Morgenfeld parte de una visión materialista histórica en la que las relaciones internacionales se fundamentan en elementos de carácter económico-sociales comprendidos “en el marco de las relaciones políticas, económicas, sociales, estratégicas e ideológicas más generales.” (422) De ahí que afirme que las políticas externas de Argentina y Estados Unidos estuvieron “determinadas por los intereses económicos sociales que defendían las clases dirigentes de sus países”. (424) Morgenfeld, consciente de las limitaciones de este tipo de argumento, plantea que “esto no quiere decir que respondieran mecánica ni automáticamente  a las necesidades de las clases dominantes y de los capitales argentinos y estadounidenses, sino que la dirección de dichas políticas podía desplegarse, en el mediano y largo plazo, según los límites que imponían estas necesidades.” (424) El autor reconoce, además, la influencia de otros factores en este proceso: las coyunturas en que se desarrollaron cada una de las conferencias panamericanas, las luchas políticas internas, las disputas de carácter ideológico, los aspectos estratégicos, los aspectos culturales y los individuos (las ambiciones personales de los representantes poíticos y diplomáticos de cada país).  En otras palabras, Morgenfeld tiene claro que los factores económicos-sociales no se dan un vacío político, ideológico o cultural.  Este es un acercamiento que me parece valioso, ya que resalta la importancia de las clases sociales en el estudio de las relaciones internacionales sin caer en determinismos.

Delegados de la Primera Conferencia Panamericana, Washington, 1889

Delegados de la Primera Conferencia Panamericana, Washington, 1889

Como parte de su enfoque materialista, el autor se muestra muy preocupado por ubicar las relaciones argentino-estadounidense en el contexto del desarrollo del capital y de las luchas inter-imperialistas. De ahí que preste atención al papel y evolución de Argentina como país dependiente y exportador, y el de Estados Unidos como potencia industrial y financiera ascendente. Esta evolución, y  el carácter competitivo de las economías de ambos países, determinó la participación de la delegación argentina en las conferencias panamericanas. En otras palabras, las disputas comerciales causadas por el efecto del proteccionismo estadounidense sobre los productos argentinos fue un factor determinante en la actitud que Argentina asumió frente a las propuestas norteamericanas. Durante el periodo analizado por el autor, los intereses agropecuarios norteamericanos fueron capaces de bloquear o limitar el acceso de los productos argentinos al mercado del vecino del norte, mientras que Argentina importaba cada vez más productos estadounidenses.  Los delegados argentinos en las conferencias buscaron, infructuosamente, revertir esta relación asimétrica. Esta situación unida al hecho de que hasta mediados del siglo XX la relación con Estados Unidos era mucho menor que la que los argentinos mantenían con Europa, llevaron a Argentina “a ser quizás el país más escéptico respecto al proyecto panamericano que impulsaba el país del Norte para consolidar su hegemonía en la región”. (428)

Para detener el avance norteamericano en América Latina, Argentina buscó “encolumnar tras de sí a los países latinoamericanos, con desigual éxito, según las coyunturas diversas.” (428) Argentina logró sabotear los planes estadounidenses  en la misma Primera Conferencia Panamericana celebrada en Washington en 1889. En los primeros años del siglo XX, Argentina mantuvo en jaque a los estadounidenses al cuestionar el intervencionismo norteamericano en el Caribe y América Central. Entre 1914 y 1929,Argentina mantuvo lo que el autor describe como un triángulo económico con Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña. El vecino norteamericano pasó a ser su principal inversor  extranjero mientras se mantuvo una relación comercial especial con los británicos. Durante este periodo el gobierno argentino mantuvo sus críticas contra las intervenciones estadounidenses en América Central y contra el proteccionismo estadounidense. Durante los años de crisis iniciados en 1929, se mantuvo la relación triangular.

Pan-American Conference in Rio de Janeiro, 1906

Delegados de la Tercera Conferencia Panamericana, Rio de Janeiro, 1906

El principal conflicto en las relaciones argentino-estadounidenses se dio durante la segunda guerra mundial por la negativa de Argentina a romper relaciones diplomáticas con los países del Eje, por lo que quedo fuera del sistema interamericano. El gobierno argentino insistió en mantener su neutralidad por la “fuerza y presión de los sectores nacionalistas, neutralistas y antiestadounidenses.” (429)  Gran Bretaña, consciente de que Estados Unidos buscaba desplazarle, fue mucho más tolerante con la neutralidad argentina. Una vez acabado el conflicto mundial, las necesidades geopolíticas de la recién estrenada guerra fría jugaron a favor de la readmisión de Argentina en el sistema interamericano.

En el periodo de la posguerra, Argentina asumió una actitud mucho más cooperativa con Estados Unidos  por varias razones. Primero, porque la reciente dependencia en las importaciones estratégicas, préstamos e insumos militares estadounidenses debilitó la capacidad de resistencia argentina. Segundo, porque el fracaso de su proyecto de desarrollo, obligó a Perón a buscar un acercamiento con Estados Unidos, dulcificando las posiciones y actitudes argentinas. Perón buscaba ayuda económica y financiamiento estadounidenses y por ello adoptó una estrategia de negociación. Tercero, porque el poderío e influencia de Estados Unidos hacían más difícil a Argentina enfrentar a su vecino del Norte o influir sobre las demás naciones americanas. A pesar de todo ello, las relaciones bilaterales no siempre fueron buenas, especialmente, por la política “tercermundista” de Perón.

Morgenfeld concluye que la  “continuidad que se observa, en los 75 años analizados, es el enfrentamiento o bien la reticencia argentina a seguir las políticas estadounidenses en el continente”. (430) Es necesario subrayar que la actitud argentina frente a las aspiraciones hegemónicas norteamericanas no fue producto de visiones o actitudes anti-imperialistas o latinoamericanistas, sino mas bien consecuencia de la vinculación-dependencia de la oligarquía argentina con Europa. De acuerdo con el autor, Argentina fue incapaz de desarrollar una agenda propia o de promover la integración latinoamericana frente a Estados Unidos por su condición de nación dependiente y la actitud europeísta y racista de su oligarquía.

George Marshall se dirige a la Novena Conferencia Panamericana en Bogotá, 1948

No puedo terminar si hacer un varios cometarios finales. Comenzaré con el tema del panamericanismo, que por razones obvias es uno central en esta obra. Para el autor, el panamericanismo estadounidense respondía a  “necesidades geoestratégicas” y económicas. El gobierno estadounidense impulsó el panamericanismo como una herramienta para enfrentar la presencia de otras potencias capitalistas en la región americana y el América del Sur en particular. Es necesario recordar que los europeos –especialmente, los británicos– disfrutaron hasta la primera guerra mundial de una posición dominante en el comercio y las inversiones extranjeras en América del Sur.  El panamericanismo respondía, según el autor, a las necesidades de “los grandes exportadores estadounidenses” que querían ampliar sus mercados externos  y del interés de  los capitalistas financieros de ampliar su presencia en América del Sur.  En términos estratégicos, el panamericanismo buscaba “afirmar la unidad –bajo la hegemonía estadounidense­– del continente americano, que incluyera formas de resolver los litigios, de llegar acuerdos de paz, de establecer la defensa continental y de repeler potenciales ataques extracontinentales. Era la puesta en práctica, en algún sentido, de la vieja doctrina Monroe.” (423) En conclusión, los estadounidenses usaron  el panamericanismo como una herramienta para expansión de su capital y para “horadar” la presencia hegemónica británica en América del Sur.

Uno de los puntos que más me sorprendió de este libro es que su autor identifica la presencia de puertorriqueños como miembros de la delegación estadounidense a dos conferencias panamericanas: la Tercera Conferencia Panamericana (Rio de Janeiro, 1906) y la Octava Conferencia Panamericana (Lima, 1938). A la reunión de Rio acudió Tulio Larrinaga y a la conferencia de Lima Emilio del Toro, Juez Presidente de la Corte Suprema de Puerto Rico. Por razones obvias, Morgenfeld no le presta mayor atención a este punto que también ha pasado inadvertido para la historiografía puertorriqueña. ¿Quién decidió la presencia de estos puertorriqueños en la delegaciones estadounidenses? ¿Qué se buscaba con ello? ¿Qué papel jugaron ambos durante las reuniones panamericanas? Estas son peguntas que, a mi entender, merecen ser atendidas, ya que podrían aportar en el estudio de un tema más amplio: el papel jugado por la colonia más antigua del mundo en la diplomacia latinoamericana de su metrópoli.

Debo también destacar un elemento metodológico: Vecinos en conflictos es el resultado de un impresionante trabajo de investigación en  archivos argentinos y estadounidenses. Morgenfeld consultó las fuentes contenidas por el Archivo del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores y Culto de la República Argentina (AMREC) y por la National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) en Washington D.C.. La combinación y análisis crítico de fuentes argentinas y estadounidenses le imprimen a este libro una gran profundidad y seriedad metodológica.

Relaciones Peligrosas. Argentina y EEUUPara terminar, este libro es una aportación muy valiosa al estudio no sólo de las relaciones argentino-estadounidenses, sino también de las relaciones interamericanas en general. Morgenfeld hace un excelente trabajo analizando la interacción argentino-estadounidense en las conferencias panamericanas en un marco regional amplio. Vecinos en conflicto subraya también  la importancia del estudio de Estados Unidos en América Latina. Es por todo ello que me genera gran expectativa la salida del próximo libro de Morgenfeld  Relaciones peligrosas. Argentina y Estados Unidos(Buenos Aires: Capital Intelectual, diciembre 2012), que, además, se da en una coyuntura muy interesante como consecuencia del embargo de la Fragata Libertad y del fallo del Juez Thomas Griesa, ordenándole a Argentina pagar $1450 millones a los fondos buitre.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, 1ro de diciembre de 2012

Read Full Post »

Comparto con todos ustedes mi participación el pasado 8 de noviembre en el programa HablaPUCP, donde fui entrevistado por el Dr. Eduardo Dargent sobre el resultado de las elecciones estadounidenses.

Read Full Post »

En un artículo publicado recientemente en la revista The American Conservative titulado “How we became Israel”, el historiador norteamericano Andrew Bacevich examina la israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos. El término no es mío, sino del propio Bacevich, y hace referencia al alegado creciente uso por Estados Unidos de tácticas y estrategias practicadas por el estado de Israel. Bacevich no es un autor ajeno a este blog, ya  que he reseñado varios de sus escritos porque le considero uno de los analistas más honestos y, por ende, valientes de la política exterior de su país. En el contexto de un posible ataque israelí contra Irán –que arrastraría a los Estados Unidos a una guerra innecesaria y muy peligrosa– me parece necesario reseñar este artículo, ya que analiza elementos muy importantes de las actuales relaciones israelíes-norteamericanas.

Bacevich comienza su artículo  con una reflexión sobre la paz y la violencia. Según éste,  la paz tiene significados que varían de acuerdo con el país o gobierno que los defina. Para unos, la paz es sinónimo de armonía basada en la tolerancia y el respeto. Para otros, no es más que un eufemismo para dominar. Un país comprometido con la paz recurre a la violencia como último recurso y esa había sido, según Bacevich, la actitud histórica de los Estados Unidos. Por el contrario, si un país ve la paz como sinónimo de dominio, hará un uso menos limitado de la violencia Ese es el caso de Israel desde hace mucho tiempo y lo que le preocupa al autor es que, según él,  desde fines de la guerra fría también ha sido la actitud de los Estados Unidos.  De acuerdo con Bacevich:

“As a consequence, U.S. national-security policy increasingly conforms to patterns of behavior pioneered by the Jewish state. This “Israelification” of U.S. policy may prove beneficial for Israel. Based on the available evidence, it’s not likely to be good for the United States.”

Es claro que para Bacevich la llamada israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos no es buen negocio para su nación. El autor le dedica el resto de su artículo a analizar este fenómeno.

Como parte de su análisis, el autor hace una serie de observaciones muy críticas y pertinentes sobre Israel. Comienza  examinando la visión sobre la paz del actual primer ministro israelí, partiendo de unas expresiones hechas por Benjamin Netanyahu en 2009, reclamando la total desmilitarización de la franja de Gaza y de la margen occidental del río Jordán como requisitos para un acuerdo de paz con los palestinos. Para Bacevich, estas exigencias no tienen sentido alguno porque los palestinos pueden ser una molestia para Israel, pero no constituyen una amenaza dada la enorme superioridad militar de los israelíes, cosa que se suele olvidar, añadiría yo, con demasiada facilidad y frecuencia. Bacevich concluye que para los israelíes la paz se deriva de la seguridad absoluta, basada no en la ventaja sino en la supremacía militar.

La insistencia en esa supremacía ha hecho necesario que Israel lleve a cabo lo que el autor denomina como “anticipatory action”, es decir, acciones preventivas contra lo que los israelíes han percibido como amenazas (“perceived threats”). Uno de los ejemplos que hace referencia el autor es el ataque israelí contra las facilidades nucleares iraquíes en 1981.  Sin embargo, con estas acciones los israelíes no se han limitado a defenderse, sino que  convirtieron la percepción de amenaza en oportunidad de expansión territorial. Bacevich da como ejemplos los ataques israelíes contra Egipto en 1956 y 1967 que, según él, no ocurrieron porque los egipcios tuvieran la capacidad de destruir a Israel. Tales ataques se dieron porque abrían la oportunidad de la ganancia territorial por vía de la conquista. Ganancia que en el caso de la guerra de 1967 ha tenido serias consecuencias estratégicas para Israel.

Bacevich examina otro elemento clave de la política de seguridad israelí: los asesinatos selectivos (“targeted assassinations”).  Los israelíes  han convertido la eliminación física de sus adversarios ­­–a través del uso del terrorismo, añadiría yo– en el sello distintivo del arte de la guerra israelí, eclipsando así métodos militares convencionales y dañando la imagen internacional de Israel.

Lo que  Bacevich no entiende y le preocupa, es por qué Estados Unidos han optado por seguir los pasos de Israel. Según éste, desde la administración del primer Bush, su país ha oscilado hacia la búsqueda del dominio militar global, hacia el uso de acciones militares preventivas y hacia a los asesinatos selectivos (en referencia al uso de vehículos aéreos no tripulados ­­–los llamados “drones”-  como arma antiterrorista creciente). Todo ello justificado, como en el caso de Israel,  como medida defensiva y como herramienta de seguridad nacional. Al autor se la hace difícil entender esta israelificación porque contrario a Israel, Estados Unidos es un país grande, con una gran población y sin enemigos  cercanos. En otras palabras, los norteamericanos tienen opciones y ventajas que los israelíes no poseen. A pesar de ello, Estados Unidos ha sucumbido “into an Israeli-like condition of perpetual war, with peace increasingly tied to unrealistic expectations of adversaries and would-be adversaries acquiescing in Washington’s will.”

Para Bacevich, este proceso de israelificación comenzó con la Operación Tormenta del Desierto, un conflicto tan rápido e impactante como la guerra de los siete días. Clinton contribuyó a este proceso con  intervenciones militares frecuentes (Haití, Bosnia, Serbia, Sudán, etc.). El segundo Bush –fiel creyente de la estrategia del “ Full Spectrum Dominance” (Dominación de espectro completo)– se embarcó en la liberación y transformación del mundo islámico. Bajo su liderato, Estados Unidos hizo, como Israel, uso de la guerra preventiva. De acuerdo con el autor, invadir Irak era visto por Bush y su gente como un acción preventiva contra lo que se percibía como una amenaza, pero también como  una oportunidad. Al atacar a Saddam Hussein, Bush no adoptó el concepto  de disuasión (“deterrence”) de la guerra fría, sino la versión israelí. La estrategia de “deterrence” de la guerra fría buscaba disuadir al oponente de llevar a cabo acciones bélicas mientras que la versión israelí está fundamentada en el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza. A los israelíes no les basta con amedrentar y han dejado atrás el bíblico ojo por ojo. Para ellos es necesario castigar desproporcionadamente para enviar una mensaje  de fuerza a sus enemigos. Basta recordar los 1,397 palestinos muertos en Gaza durante las tres semanas que duró la Operación Plomo Fundido a finales de 2008 y principios de 2009. De ellos, 345 eran menores de edad. [Según B'TSELEMThe Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories–, entre setiembre de 2000 y setiembre de 2012, las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes mataron a 6,500 palestinos en los territorios ocupados y a 69 en Israel. Durante ese mismo periodo, los palestinos asesinaron a 754 civiles y 343 miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes.]

De acuerdo con Bacevich, el objetivo de la administración Bush al invadir Irak era también enviar un mensaje: esto le puede pasar a quienes reten la voluntad de Estados Unidos. Desafortunadamente para Bush, la invasión y ocupación de Irak resultó un fracaso similar a la invasión israelí del Líbano en 1982.

El proceso de israelificación analizado por Bacevich tomó una nuevo giró bajo la presidencia de Obama, quien transformó el uso de los drones para asesinatos selectivos en la pieza clave de la política de seguridad nacional de Estados Unidos.

Bacevich concluye que, a pesar de que no favorece los intereses de Estados Unidos, el proceso de israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional estadounidense ya se ha completado, y que será muy difícil revertirlo dado el clima político reinante en la nación norteamericana.

Lo primero que debo señalar es que el uso del asesinato selectivo por el gobierno estadounidense como arma política no comenzó con los drones. Basta recordar los hallazgos del famoso Comité Church que en la década de 1970 investigó las actividades del aparato de inteligencia norteamericano en el Tercer Mundo. En un informe de catorce volúmenes, este comité legislativo documentó las actividades ilegales llevadas a cabo por la CIA, entre ellas, el asesinato e intento de asesinato de líderes del Tercer Mundo. ¿Cuántas veces ha intentado la CIA matar a Fidel Castro? ¿Cuántos miembros del Vietcong fueron capturados, torturados y asesinados por la CIA y sus asociados a través del Programa Phoenix en los años 1960? Lo que han hecho los drones es transformar la eliminación física de los enemigos  de Estados Unidos en un proceso a control remoto y, por ende, “seguro” para los estadounidenses.

A pesar estas críticas, considero que este ensayo es valioso por varias razones. Primero, porque refleja la creciente preocupación entre sectores académicos, militares y gubernamentales norteamericanos por la enorme influencia que ejerce Israel sobre la política exterior y doméstica de los Estados Unidos. Afortunadamente, no todos los estadounidenses creen que Estados Unidos debe apoyar a Israel incondicionalmente, especialmente, cuando es claro que tal apoyo tiene un gran costo político y económico para Estados Unidos. Segundo, porque desarrollar una discusión pública y abierta de este tema es extremadamente necesario para contrarrestar la influencia del “lobby” pro-israelí en los Estados Unidos (y a nivel mundial). En ese sentido, este ensayo cumple una función muy importante al criticar la política de seguridad de Israel desde una óptica  honesta. Bacevich no teme llamar las cosas por su nombre y no duda en describir la actual política de seguridad israelí como una basada en asesinatos selectivos y el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza, y que, además, no busca la paz, sino el dominio y la expansión territorial.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, Perú, 11 de noviembre de 2012

Read Full Post »

Mañana 8 de noviembre estaré comentando los resultados de las elecciones norteamericanas en HablaPUCP, un programa de entrevistas de PuntoEdu, periódico de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú,  transmitido todos los jueves a las 3 de la tarde. Quedan cordialmene invitados.

 

Read Full Post »

Revisando viejos archivos, encontré este ensayo sobre el expansionismo norteamericano que escribí hace ya varios años por encargo del Departamento de Educación del gobierno de Puerto Rico. Desafortunadamente,  el libro de ensayos del que debió formar parte nunca fue publicado. Lo comparto con mis lectores con la esperanza  que les sea interesante o útil.  

 La expansión territorial es una de las características más importantes del desarrollo histórico de los Estados Unidos. En sus primeros cien años de vida la nación norteamericana experimentó un impresionante crecimiento territorial. Las trece colonias originales se expandieron  hasta convertirse en  un país atrapado por dos océanos. Como veremos, este fue un proceso complejo que se dio a través de la anexión, compra y conquista de nuevos territorios

Es necesario aclarar que la expansión territorial norteamericana fue algo más que un simple proceso de crecimiento territorial, pues estuvo asociada a elementos de tipo cultural, político, ideológico, racial y estratégico. El expansionismo es un elemento vital en la historia de los Estados Unidos, presente desde el mismo momento de la fundación de las primeras colonias británicas en Norte América. Éste fue considerado un elemento esencial en los primeros cien años de historia de los Estados Unidos como nación independiente, ya que se veía no sólo como algo económica y geopolíticamente necesario, sino también como una expresión de  la esencia nacional norteamericana.

No debemos olvidar que la  fundación de las trece colonias que dieron vida a los Estados Unidos formó parte de un proceso histórico más amplio: la expansión europea  de los siglos XVI y XVII. Durante ese periodo las principales naciones de Europa occidental se lanzaron a explorar y conquistar  dando forma a vastos imperios en Asia y América. Una de esas naciones fue Inglaterra, metrópoli de las trece colonias norteamericanas. Es por ello que el expansionismo norteamericano puede ser considerado, hasta cierta forma, una extensión del imperialismo inglés.

Los Estados Unidos  experimentaron dos tipos de expansión en su historia: la continental y la extra-continental. La primera es la expansión territorial contigua, es decir, en territorios adyacentes  a los Estados Unidos.  Ésta fue  vista como algo natural y justificado pues se ocupaba terreno  que se consideraba “vacío” o habitado por pueblos “inferiores”. La llamada expansión extra-continental se dio a finales del siglo XIX y llevó a los norteamericanos a trascender los límites del continente americano para adquirir territorios alejados de los Estados Unidos (Hawai, Guam y Filipinas). Ésta  provocó una fuerte oposición y un intenso debate en torno a la naturaleza misma de la nación norteamericana, pues muchos le consideraron contraria a la tradición y las instituciones políticas de los Estados Unidos.

 El Tratado de París de 1783

El primer crecimiento territorial de los Estados Unidos se dio en el mismo momento de alcanzar su independencia. En 1783, norteamericanos y británicos llegaron a acuerdo por el cual Gran Bretaña reconoció la independencia de las  trece colonias y se fijaron los límites geográficos de la nueva nación. En el Tratado de París las fronteras de la joven república fueron definidas de la siguiente forma: al norte los Grandes Lagos, al oeste el Río Misisipí y al sur el paralelo 31. Con ello la joven república duplicó su territorio.

Los territorios adquiridos en 1783 fueron objeto de polémica,  pues surgió la pregunta de qué hacer con ellos. La solución a este problema fue la creación de las Ordenanzas del Noroeste (Northwest Ordinance, 1787). Con ésta ley se creó un sistema de territorios en preparación para convertirse en estados. Los nuevos estados entrarían a la unión norteamericana en igualdad de condiciones y derechos que los trece originales. De esta forma los líderes norteamericanos rechazaron el colonialismo y crearon un mecanismo para la incorporación política de nuevos territorios. Las Ordenanzas del Noroeste sentaron un precedente histórico que no sería roto hasta 1898: todos los territorios adquiridos por los Estados Unidos en su expansión continental serían incorporados como estados de la Unión cuando éstos cumpliesen los requisitos definidos para ello.

La compra de Luisiana

La república estadounidense nace en medio de un periodo muy convulso de la historia de la Humanidad: el periodo de las Revoluciones Atlánticas. Entre 1789 y 1824, el mundo atlántico vivió un etapa de gran violencia e inestabilidad política producida por el estallido de varias revoluciones socio-políticas (Revolución Francesa, Guerras napoleónicas, Revolución Haitiana, Guerras de independencia en Hispanoamérica). Estas revoluciones tuvieron un impacto severo en las relaciones exteriores de los Estados Unidos y en su proceso de expansión territorial.

Para el año 1801 Europa disfrutaba de un raro periodo de paz. Aprovechando esta situación   Napoleón Bonaparte obligó a España a cederle a Francia el territorio de Luisiana. Con ello el emperador francés buscaba crear un imperio americano usando como base la colonia francesa de Saint Domingue (Haití). Luisiana era una amplia extensión de tierra al oeste de los Estados Unidos en donde se encuentran ríos muy importantes para la transportación.

Esta transacción preocupó profundamente a los funcionarios del gobierno norteamericano por varias razones. Primero, ésta ponía en peligro del acceso norteamericano al río Misisipí y al puerto y la ciudad de Nueva Orleáns, amenazando así la salida al Golfo de México, y con ello al comercio del oeste norteamericano. Segundo, el control francés de Luisiana cortaba las posibilidades de expansión al Oeste. Tercero, la presencia de una potencia europea agresiva y poderosa como vecino de los Estados Unidos no era un escenario que agradaba al liderato estadounidense. En otras palabras, la adquisición de Luisiana por Napoleón amenazaba las posibilidades de expansión territorial y representaba una seria amenaza a la economía y la seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos. Por ello no nos debe sorprender que algunos sectores políticos norteamericanos propusieran una guerra para evitar el control napoleónico sobre Luisiana. A pesar de la seriedad de este asunto, el liderato norteamericano optó por una solución diplomática. El presidente Thomas Jefferson ordenó al embajador norteamericano en Francia, Robert Livingston, comprarle Nueva Orleáns a Napoleón. Para sorpresa de Livingston, Napoleón aceptó vender toda la Luisiana porque el reinició de la guerra en Europa y el fracaso francés en Haití frenaron sus sueños de un imperio americano. En 1803, se llegó a un acuerdo por el cual los Estados Unidos adquirieron Luisiana por $15,000,000, lo que constituyó uno de los mejores negocios de bienes raíces de la historia.

La compra de Luisiana representó un problema moral y político para el Presidente Jefferson, pues éste era un defensor de una interpretación estricta de la constitución estadounidense. Jefferson pensaba que la constitución no autorizaba la adquisición de territorios, por lo que la compra de Luisiana podía ser inconstitucional. A pesar de sus reservas constitucionales, el presidente adoptó una posición pragmática y apoyó la compra de Luisiana. Para entender porque Jefferson hizo esto es necesario enfocar su visión de la política exterior y del expansionismo norteamericano. Jefferson era el más claro y ferviente defensor del expansionismo entre los fundadores de la nación norteamericana. Éste tenía un proyecto expansionista muy ambicioso que pretendía lograr de forma pacífica.  Según él, los Estados Unidos tenían el deber de ser ejemplo para los pueblos oprimidos expandiendo la libertad por el mundo. De esta forma Jefferson se convirtió en uno de los creadores de la idea de que los Estados Unidos eran una nación predestinada a guiar al mundo a una nueva era por medio del abandono de la razón de estado y la aplicación de las convicciones morales a la política exterior. Esta idea de Jefferson estaba asociada a la distinción entre  republicanismo y monarquía. Las monarquías respondían a los intereses de los reyes y las repúblicas como los Estados Unidos a los intereses del pueblo, por ende, las repúblicas eran pacíficas y las monarquías no. Jefferson rechazaba la idea de que las repúblicas debían de permanecer pequeñas para sobrevivir. Éste creía posible la expansión pacífica de los Estados Unidos, es decir, la transformación de la nación norteamericana en un imperio sin sacrificar la libertad y el republicanismo democrático.

Territorio adquirido en la compra de Luisiana

Para Jefferson, conservar el carácter agrario del país era imprescindible para salvaguardar la naturaleza republicana de los Estados Unidos, pues era necesario que el país continuara siendo una sociedad de ciudadanos libres e independientes. Sólo a través de la expansión se podía garantizar la abundancia de tierra y, por ende, la subsistencia de las instituciones republicanas norteamericanas. Al apoyar la compra de Luisiana, Jefferson superó sus escrúpulos con relación a la interpretación de la constitución para garantizar su principal razón de estado: la expansión.

La era de los buenos sentimientos

Años de controversias relacionadas a los derechos comerciales de los Estados Unidos culminaron en 1812 con el estallido de una guerra contra Gran Bretaña. El fin de la llamada Guerra de 1812 trajo consigo un periodo de estabilidad y consenso nacional conocido como la  Era de los buenos sentimientos. Sin embargo,  a nivel internacional la situación de los Estados Unidos era todavía complicada, pues era necesario resolver dos asuntos muy importantes: mejorar las relaciones con Gran Bretaña y definir la frontera sur. La solución de ambos asuntos estuvo relacionada con la expansión territorial.

Mejorar las relaciones con Gran Bretañas tras dos guerras resultó ser una tarea delicada que fue facilitada por realidades económicas: Gran Bretaña era el principal mercado de los Estados Unidos.En 1818, los británicos y norteamericanos resolvieron algunos de sus problemas a través de la negociación. Los reclamos anglo-norteamericanos sobre el territorio de  Oregon era  uno de ellos. Los británicos tenían una antigua relación  con la región gracias a sus intereses en el comercio de pieles en la costa noroeste del  Pacífico.  Por su parte, los norteamericanos basaban sus reclamos en los viajes del Capitán Robert Gray (1792) y en famosa la expedición de Lewis y Clark  (1804-1806). En 1818, los Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña acordaron una ocupación conjunta de Oregon.  De acuerdo a ésta, el territorio permanecería abierto por un periodo de diez años.

Una vez resuelto los problemas con Gran Bretaña los norteamericanos se enfocaron en las disputas con España con relación a Florida. El interés norteamericano en la Florida era viejo y basado en necesidades estratégicas: evitar que Florida cayera en manos de una potencia europea. En 1819, España y los Estados Unidos firmaron el Tratado Adams-Onís por el que Florida pasó a ser un territorio norteamericano a cambio de que los Estados Unidos pagaran los reclamos de los residentes de la península hasta un total de $5 millones. La adquisición de Florida también puso fin a los temores de los norteamericanos de un posible ataque por su frontera sur.

La Doctrina Monroe

El fin de la era de las revoluciones atlánticas a principios de la década de 1820 generó nuevas preocupaciones en los  Estados Unidos. Los líderes estadounidenses vieron con recelo los acontecimientos en Europa, donde las fuerzas más conservadoras controlaban las principales reinos e imperaba un ambiente represivo y extremadamente reaccionario.  El principal temor  de los norteamericanos era la posibilidad da una intervención europea para reestablecer el control español en sus excolonias americanas. A los británicos también les preocupaba tal contingencia  y tantearon la posibilidad de una alianza con los Estados Unidos. La propuesta británica provocó un gran debate entre los miembros de la administración del presidente James Monroe. El Secretario de Estado John Quincy Adams  desconfiaba de los británicos y temía que cualquier compromiso con éstos pudiese limitar las posibilidades de expansión norteamericana. Adams temía la posibilidad de una intervención europea en América, pero estaba seguro que  de darse  tal intervención Gran Bretaña se opondría de todas maneras para defender sus intereses, sobre todo, comerciales. Por ello concluía que los Estados Unidos no sacarían ningún beneficio aliándose con Gran Bretaña. Para él, la mejor opción para los Estados Unidos era mantenerse actuando solos.

Los argumentos de Adams influyeron la posición del presidente Monroe quien rechazó la alianza con los británicos. El 2 de diciembre de 1823, Monroe leyó un importante mensaje ante el Congreso. Parte del  contenido de este mensaje pasaría a ser conocido como la Doctrina Monroe. En su mensaje, Monroe enfatizó la singularidad (“uniqueness”) de los Estados Unidos y definió el llamado principio de la “noncolonization,” es decir, el rechazo norteamericano a la colonización, recolonización y/o transferencia de territorios americanos. Además, Adams estableció una política de exclusión de Europa de los asuntos americanos y definió  así las ideas principales de la Doctrina Monroe. Las palabras de Monroe constituyeron una declaración formal de que los Estados Unidos pretendían convertirse en el poder dominante en el hemisferio occidental.

Es necesario aclarar que la Doctrina Monroe fue una fanfarronada porque en 1823 los Estados Unidos no tenían el  poderío para hacerla cumplir. Sin embargo, esta doctrina será una de las piedras angulares de la política exterior norteamericana en América Latina hasta finales del siglo XX y una de las bases ideológicas del expansionismo norteamericano.

El Destino Manifiesto

John L. O’Sullivan

En 1839, el periodista norteamericano John L. O’Sullivan escribió un artículo periodístico justificando la expansión territorial de los Estados Unidos. Según O’Sullivan, los Estados Unidos eran un pueblo  escogido por Dios y destinado a expandirse a lo largo de América del Norte. Para O’Sullivan, la expansión no era una opción para los norteamericanos, sino un destino que éstos no podían renunciar ni evitar porque estarían rechazando la voluntad de Dios. O’Sullivan también creía que los norteamericanos tenían una misión que cumplir: extender la libertad y la democracia, y ayudar a las razas inferiores.  Las ideas de O’Sullivan no eran nuevas, pero llegaron en un momento de gran agitación nacionalista y expansionista en la historia de los Estados Unidos.  Éstas fueron adaptadas bajo una frase que el propio O’Sullivan acuñó, el destino manifiesto, y se convirtieron en la justificación básica del expansionismo norteamericano.

La idea del destino manifiesto estaba enraizada en la visión de los Estados Unidos como una nación excepcional destinada a civilizar a los pueblos atrasados y expandir la libertad por el mundo. Es decir, en una visión mesiánica y mística que veía en la expansión norteamericana la expresión de la voluntad de Dios. Ésta estaba también basada en un concepto claramente racista que dividía a los seres humanos en razas superiores e inferiores. De ahí que se pensara que era deber de las razas superiores “ayudar” a las inferiores. Como miembros de una “raza superior”, la anglosajona, los norteamericanos debían cumplir con su deber y misión.

La anexión de Oregon

Como sabemos, en 1819, los Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña acordaron ocupar de forma conjunta el territorio de Oregon. Ambos países reclamaban ese territorio como suyo y al no poder ponerse de acuerdo optaron por compartirlo.  Por los próximos veinte cinco años, miles de colonos norteamericanos emigraron y se establecieron en Oregon estimulados por el gobierno de los Estados Unidos.

Las elecciones presidenciales de 1844 estuvieron dominadas por el tema de la expansión. La candidatura de James K. Polk por los demócratas estuvo basada en la propuesta de “recuperar” Oregon y anexar Texas. Polk era un expansionista realista que presionó a los británicos dando la impresión de ser intransigente y estar dispuesto a una guerra, pero que en el momento apropiado fue capaz de negociar. En 1846, el Presidente Polk solicitó la retirada británica del territorio de Oregon aprovechando que complicada por problemas en su imperio, Gran Bretaña no estaba en condiciones para resistir tal pedido.  Tras una negociación se acordó establecer la frontera en el paralelo 49 y todo el territorio al sur de esa  frontera pasó a ser parte de los Estados Unidos.

American Progress, John Gast , 1872

Texas

En 1821, un ciudadano norteamericano llamado Moses Austin fue autorizado por el gobierno mexicano a establecer 300 familias estadounidenses en Texas, que para esa época era un territorio mexicano. La llegada de Austin y su grupo de emigrantes marcó el origen de una colonia norteamericana en Texas. El número de norteamericanos residentes en Texas creció considerablemente  hasta alcanzar un total de 20,000 en el año 1830. Las relaciones con el gobierno de México se afectaron negativamente cuando los mexicanos, preocupados por el gran número de norteamericanos residentes en Texas, buscaron reestablecer el control político del territorio. Para ello los mexicanos recurrieron a frenar la emigración de ciudadanos estadounidenses y a limitar el gobierno propio que disfrutaban los texanos (norteamericanos residentes en Texas). Todo ello llevó a los texanos a tomar acciones drásticas. En 1836, éstos se rebelaron contra el gobierno mexicano buscando su independencia.  Tras una derrota inicial en la Batalla del Álamo, los texanos derrotaron a los mexicanos en la Batalla de San Jacinto y con ello lograron su independencia.

Después de derrotar a los mexicanos y declararse independientes, los texanos solicitaron se admitiera a Texas como un estado de la unión norteamericana. Este pedido provocó un gran debate en los Estados Unidos, pues no todos los norteamericanos estaban contentos con la idea de que Texas, un territorio esclavista, se convirtiera en un estado de la unión. Los sureños eran los principales defensores de la concesión de la estadidad a Texas, pues sabían que con ello aumentaría la representación de los estados esclavistas en el Congreso (la asamblea legislativa estadounidense). Los norteños se  oponían a la concesión de la estadidad a Texas porque no quería fortalecer políticamente a la esclavitud dando vida a un nuevo estado esclavista. Además, algunos norteamericanos estaban temerosos de la posibilidad de un guerra innecesaria con México por causa de Texas, pues creían que el gobierno mexicano no toleraría que los Estados Unidos anexaran su antiguo territorio.

El tema de Texas sacó a flote las complejidades y contradicciones de la expansión norteamericana. La expansión podría traer consigo la semilla de la libertad como alegaban algunos, pero también de la esclavitud y la autodestrucción nacional. Cada nuevo territorio sacaba a relucir la pregunta sobre el futuro de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos y esto provocaba intensos debates e inclusive la amenaza de la secesión de los estados sureños.

La guerra con México

La elección de Polk como presidente de los Estados Unidos aceleró el proceso de estadidad para Texas. Éste era un ferviente creyente de la idea del destino manifiesto y de la expansión territorial. Durante su campaña presidencial, Polk se comprometió con la anexión de Texas. En 1845, Texas fue no sólo anexada, sino también incorporada como un estado de la Unión. Ello obedeció a tres razones: la necesidad de asegurar la frontera sur, evitar intervenciones extranjeras en Texas y el peligro de una movida texana a favor de Gran Bretaña. Como habían planteado los opositores a la concesión de la estadidad a Texas, México no aceptó la anexión de Texas y  rompió sus relaciones diplomáticas con los Estados Unidos. Con la anexión de Texas, los Estados Unidos hicieron suyos los problemas fronterizos que existían entre los texanos y el gobierno de México, lo que eventualmente provocó una guerra con ese país. La superioridad militar de los norteamericanos sobre los mexicanos fue total. Las tropas estadounidenses llegaron inclusive a ocupar la ciudad capital del México.

Las fáciles victorias norteamericanos desataron un gran nacionalismo en los Estados Unidos y llevaron a algunos norteamericanos a favorecer la anexión de todo el territorio mexicano. Los sureños se opusieron a la posible anexión de todo México por razones raciales, pues consideraban a los mexicanos racialmente incapaces de incorporarse a los Estados Unidos.  Algunos estados del norte, bajo la influencia de un fuerte sentimiento expansionista, favorecieron la anexión de todo México. Tras grandes debates sólo fue anexado una parte del territorio mexicano.

Territorio arrebatado a México en 1848

En el Tratado de Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848)  que puso fin a la guerra, los Estados Unidos duplicaron su territorio al adquirir los actuales estados de California, Nuevo México, Arizona, Utah, y Nevada; México perdió la mitad de su territorio; México reconoció la anexión de Texas y los Estados Unidos acordaron pagarle  a México una indemnización de  $15 millones. Con ello los Estados Unidos lograron expandirse del océano Atlántico hasta el océano Pacífico. La guerra aumentó del poder de los Estados Unidos, fortaleció la seguridad del país y se abrió posibilidades de comercio con Asia a través de los puertos californianos. Sin embargo, la expansión alcanzada también expuso las debilidades domésticas de los Estados Unidos, exacerbando el  debate en torno a la esclavitud en los nuevos territorios, lo que endureció el problema del seccionalismo y llevó a la guerra civil. La victoria sobre México también promovió la expansión en territorios en poder de los amerindios norteamericanos lo que desembocó en  las llamadas guerras indias y en la reubicación forzosa de miles de nativos americanos.

Expansionismo y esclavitud

La década de 1850 estuvo caracterizada por un profundo debate en torno al futuro de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos. Los estados sureños vieron en la expansión territorial un mecanismo para fortalecer la esclavitud incorporando territorios esclavistas a la unión norteamericana. Con ello pretendían alterar el balance político de la nación a su favor creando una mayoría de estados esclavistas. Es necesario señalar que los esfuerzos de los estados sureños fueran bloqueados por el  Norte que se oponía  a la expansión de la esclavitud.

El principal objetivo de los expansionistas en este periodo fue la isla de Cuba por ser ésta una colonia esclavista de gran importancia económica y estratégica para los Estados Unidos. En 1854, los norteamericanos trataron, sin éxito, de comprarle Cuba a España por $130 millones de dólares. Los Estados Unidos tendrían que esperar más de cuarenta años para  conseguir por las armas lo que no lograron por la diplomacia.

La compra de Alaska

William H. Seward

En el periodo posterior a la guerra civil la política exterior norteamericana estuvo desorientada, lo que frenó el renacer de las ansias expansionistas. El resurgir del expansionismo estuvo asociado a la figura del Secretario de Estado William H. Seward (1801-1872). Seward era un ferviente expansionista que tenía interés en la creación de un imperio norteamericano que incluyera  Canadá, América Latina y Asia. Los planes imperialistas de Seward no pudieron concretarse y éste tuvo que conformarse con la adquisición de Alaska.

Alaska había sido explorada a lo largo de los siglos XVII y XVIII por británicos, franceses, españoles y rusos. Sin embargo, fueron estos últimos quienes iniciaron la colonización del territorio. En 1867, los Estados Unidos y Rusia entraron en conversaciones con relación al futuro de Alaska. Ambos países tenían interés en la compra-venta de Alaska por diferentes razones. Para Seward, la compra de Alaska era necesaria para garantizar la seguridad del noroeste norteamericano y expandir el comercio con Asia. Por sus parte, los rusos necesitaban dinero, Alaska era un carga económica y la colonización del territorio había sido muy difícil. Además, el costo de la defensa de Alaska era prohibitivo para Rusia. En marzo de 1867 se llegó a un acuerdo de compra-venta por $7.2 millones.

El problema de Seward no fue comprar Alaska, sino convencer a los norteamericanos de la necesidad de ello. La compra enfrentó fuerte oposición, pues se consideraba que Alaska era un territorio inservible. De ahí que se le describiera con frases como  “Seward´s Folly,” Seward´s Icebox,” o “Polar Bear Garden.” Tras mucho debate, la compra fue eventualmente aceptada y aprobada por el Congreso. Lo que en su momento pareció una locura resultó ser un gran negocio para los Estados Unidos, pues hoy en día Alaska produce el 25% del petróleo de los Estados Unidos y posee el 30% de las reservas de petróleo estadounidenses.

Hawai

Para comienzos de la década de 1840, Hawai se había convertido en una de las paradas más importantes para los barcos norteamericanos en un ruta a China. Esto generó el interés de ciertos sectores de la sociedad norteamericana.  Los primeros norteamericanos en establecerse en las islas fueron comerciantes y misioneros.  A éstos le siguieron inversionistas interesados en la producción de azúcar. Antes de 1890 el principal objetivo norteameamericano no era la anexión de Hawai, sino prevenir que otra potencia controlara el archipiélago. La actitud norteamericana hacia Hawai cambió gracias a la labor misionera, la creciente importancia de la producción azucarera como consecuencia de la reciprocidad comercial con los Estados Unidos y la importancia estratégica de las islas. El crecimiento de la población no hawaiana (norteamericanos, japoneses y chinos)  despertó la preocupación de los locales, quienes se sentían invadidos y temerosos de perder el control de su país ante la creciente influencia de los extranjeros.  La muerte en 1891  del rey Kalākaua y el ascenso al trono de  su hermana Liliuokalani provocó una fuerte reacción de parte de la comunidad norteamericana en la islas, pues la reina era una líder nacionalista que quería reafirmar la soberanía hawaiana. Los azucareros y misioneros norteamericanos la destronan en 1893 y solicitaron la anexión a los Estados Unidos. Contrario a los esperado por los norteamericanos residentes en Hawai, la estadidad no les fue concedida. Además, el Presidente Grover Cleveland encargó a James Blount investigar lo ocurrido en Hawai.  Blount viajó  a las islas y redactó un informa muy criticó de las acciones de los norteamericanos en Hawai, concluyendo que a mayoría de los hawaianos favorecían a la monarquía. Cleveland era un anti-imperialista convencido por lo que el informe de Blount lo colocó en un gran dilema: ¿restaurar por la fuerza a la reina o anexar Hawai?  Lo controversial de ambas posibles acciones llevó a Cleveland a no hacer nada.

Liliuokalani, última reina de Hawaii

Ante la imposibilidad de la estadidad, los norteamericanos en Hawai optaron por organizar un gobierno republicano. El estallido de la Guerra hispano-cubano-norteamericana en 1898 abrió las puertas a la anexión de  Hawai. Noventa  y cinco  años más tarde el Presidente William J. Clinton firmó una  disculpa oficial por el derrocamiento de la reina Liliuokalani.

La expansión extra-continental

Como hemos visto, a lo largo del siglo XIX los norteamericanos se expandieron ocupando territorios contiguos como Luisiana,  Texas y California. Sin embargo, para finales del siglo XIX la expansión territorial norteamericana entró en una nueva etapa caracterizada por la adquisición de territorios ubicados fuera  de los límites geográficos de América del Norte. La    adquisición  de Puerto Rico, Filipinas, Guam y Hawai dotó a los Estados Unidos de un imperio insular.

La expansión de finales del siglo XIX difería del expansionismo de años anteriores por varias razones. Primero, los  territorios adquiridos no sólo no eran contiguos, sino que algunos de ellos estaban ubicados muy lejos de los Estados Unidos. Segundo, estos territorios tenían una gran concentración poblacional. Por ejemplo, a la llegada de los norteamericanos a Puerto Rico la isla tenía casi un millón de habitantes. Tercero, los territorios estaban habitados por pueblos no blancos con culturas, idiomas y religiones muy diferentes a los Estados Unidos. En las Filipinas los norteamericanos encontraron católicos, musulmanes y cazadores de cabezas. Cuarto, los territorios estaban ubicados en zonas peligrosas o estratégicamente complicadas. Las Filipinas estaban rodeadas de colonias europeas y demasiado cerca de una potencia emergente y agresiva: Japón. Quinto, algunos de esos territorios resistieron violentamente la dominación norteamericana. Los filipinos no aceptaron pacíficamente el dominio norteamericano y se rebelaron. Pacificar las Filipinas les costó a los norteamericanos miles de vidas y millones de dólares. Sexto, contrario a lo que había sido la tradición norteamericana, los nuevos territorios no fueron incorporados, sino que fueron convertidos en colonias de los Estados Unidos. Todos estos factores explican porque algunos historiadores ven en las acciones norteamericanas de finales del siglo XIX un rompimiento con el pasado expansionistas de los Estados Unidos. Sin embargo, para otros historiadores –incluyendo quien escribe– la expansión de 1898 fue un episodio más de un proceso crecimiento imperialista iniciado a fines del siglo XVIII.

Para explicar la  expansión extra-continental se han usado varios argumentos. Algunos historiadores  han alegado que los norteamericanos se expandieron más allá de sus fronteras geográficas por causas económicas. Según éstos, el desarrollo industrial que vivió el país en las últimas décadas del siglo XIX hizo que los norteamericanos fabricaran más productos de los que podían consumir. Esto provocó excedentes que generaron serios problemas económicos como el desempleo, la inflación, etc. Para superar estos problemas los norteamericanos salieron a buscar nuevos mercados donde vender sus productos y fuentes de materias primas. Esa búsqueda provocó la adquisición de colonias y la expansión extra-continental.

Otros historiadores han favorecidos explicaciones de tipo ideológico. Según éstos, la idea de que la expansión era el destino de los Estados Unidos jugó, junto al sentido de misión, un papel destacado en el expansionismo norteamericanos de finales del siglo XIX. Los norteamericanos tenían un destino que cumplir y nada ni nadie podía detenerlos porque era la expresión de la voluntad divina.

La religión y la raza también ha jugado un papel importante en la explicación de las acciones imperialistas de los Estados Unidos. Según algunos historiadores, los norteamericanos fueron empujados por el afán misionero, es decir, por la idea de que la expansión del cristianismo era la voluntad de Dios. En otras palabras, para muchos norteamericanos la expansión era necesaria para llevar con ella la palabra de Dios a pueblos no cristianos.  Como miembros de una raza superior –la anglosajona– los estadounidenses debían cumplir un papel civilizador entre las razas inferiores y para ello era necesaria la expansión extra-continental.

Alfred T. Mahan

Los factores militares y estratégicos también han jugado un papel de importancia en la explicación del comportamiento imperialista de los norteamericanos. Según algunos historiadores, la necesidad de bases navales para la creciente marina de guerra de los Estados Unidos fue otra causa del expansionismo extra-continental. Éstos apuntan a la figura del Capitán Alfred T. Mahan como una fuerza influyente en el desarrollo del expansionismo extra-continental . En 1890, Mahan publicó un libro titulado The Influence of Sea Power upon History que influyó considerablemente a toda una generación de líderes norteamericanos. En su libro Mahan proponía la construcción de una marina de guerra poderosa que fuera capaz de promover y defender los intereses estratégicos y comerciales de los Estados Unidos. Según Mahan, el crecimiento de la Marina debía estar acompañado de la adquisición de colonias para la construcción de bases navales y carboneras.

Una de las explicaciones más novedosas del porque del expansionismo imperialista recurre al género. Según la historiadora norteamericana Kristin Hoganson, el impulso imperialista era una manifestación de la crisis de  la masculinidad norteamericana amenazada por el sufragismo femenino y las nuevas actitudes y posiciones femeninas. En otras palabras, algunos norteamericanos como Teodoro Roosevelt defendieron y promovieron el imperialismo como un mecanismo para reafirmar el dominio masculino sobre la sociedad norteamericana.

La expansión norteamericana de finales del siglo XIX fue un proceso muy complejo y, por ende, difícil de explicar con una sola causa. En otras palabras, es necesario prestar atención a todas las posibles explicaciones del imperialismo norteamericano para poder entenderle.

La Guerra hispano-cubano-norteamericana

En 1898, los Estados Unidos y España pelearon una corta, pero muy importante guerra. La principal causa de la llamada guerra hispanoamericana fue la isla de Cuba. Para finales del siglo XIX, el otrora poderoso imperio español estaba compuesto por las Filipinas, Cuba y Puerto Rico. De éstas la más importante era, sin lugar a dudas, Cuba porque esta isla era la principal productora de azúcar del mundo. La riqueza de Cuba era fundamental para el gobierno español, de ahí que los españoles mantuvieron un estricto control sobre la isla. Sin embargo, este control no pudo evitar el desarrollo de un fuerte sentimiento nacionalista entre los cubanos. Hartos del colonialismo español, en 1895 los cubanos se rebelaron provocando una sangrienta guerra de independencia.  Al comienzo de este conflicto el gobierno norteamericano buscó mantenerse neutral, pero el interés histórico en la isla, el desarrollo de la guerra, las inversiones norteamericanas en la isla (unos $50 millones) y la cercanía de Cuba (a sólo 90 millas de la Florida) hicieron imposible que los norteamericanos no intervinieran buscando acabar con la guerra. La situación se agravó cuando el 15 de febrero de 1898 un barco de guerra norteamericano, el USS Maine, anclado en la bahía de la Habana, explotó  matando a 266 marinos. La destrucción del Maine  generó un gran sentimiento anti-español en los Estados Unidos que obligó al gobierno norteamericano a declararle la guerra a España.

El Maine hundido en la bahía de la Habana

La guerra fue una conflicto corto que los Estados Unidos ganaron con mucha facilidad gracias a su enorme superioridad militar y económica. En el Tratado de París que puso fin a la guerra hispanoamericana, España renunció a Cuba, le cedió Puerto Rico a los norteamericanos como compensación por el costo de la guerra y entregó las Filipinas a los Estados Unidos a cambio $20,000,000. A pesar de lo corto de su duración, esta guerra tuvo consecuencias muy importantes. Primero, la guerra marcó la transformación de los Estados Unidos en una potencia mundial. El poderío que demostraron los norteamericanos al derrotar fácilmente a España dio a entender al resto del mundo que la nación norteamericana se había convertido en un país poderoso al que había que tomar en cuenta y respetar. Segundo, gracias a la guerra los Estados Unidos se convirtieron en una nación con colonias en Asia y el Caribe lo que cambió su situación geopolítica y estratégica. Tercero, la guerra cambió la historia de varios países: España se vio debilitada y en medio de una crisis; Cuba ganó su independencia, pero permaneció bajo la influencia y el control indirecto de los Estados Unidos; las Filipinas no sólo vieron desaparecer la oportunidad de independencia, sino que también fueron controladas por los norteamericanos por medio de una controversial guerra; Puerto Rico pasó a ser una colonia de los Estados Unidos.

Con la expansión extra-continental de finales del siglo XIX se cerró la expansión territorial de los Estados Unidos, pero no su crecimiento imperialista ni su transformación en la potencia dominante del siglo XX.

            Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Bibliografía mínima:

Beisner, Robert L. From the Old Diplomacy to the New, 1865-1900. Arlington Heights, Illinois: Harlan Davidson, Inc., 1986.

Benjamin, Jules R. The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution an Empire of Liberty in an Age of National Liberation. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1990.

Bouvier, Virginia Marie. Whose America? The War of 1898 and the Battles to Define the Nation. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 2001.

Drinnon, Richard. Facing West the Metaphysics of Indian-Hating and Empire-Building. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980.

Foner, Philip Sheldon. The Spanish-Cuban-American War and the Birth of American Imperialism, 1895-1902. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1972.

Healy, David. U S Expansionism. The Imperialist Urge in the 1890’s. Madison, Milwaukee and   London: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1970.

Heidler, David Stephen, and Jeanne T. Heidler. Manifest Destiny. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2003.

__________________________________. The Mexican War. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2006.

Henderson, Timothy J. A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States. New York: Hill and Wang, 2008.

Hietala, Thomas. Manifest Destiny: Anxious Aggrandizement in Late Jacksonian America. Ithaca: Cornell University press, 1985.

Hoganson, Kristin L. Fighting for American Manhood How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.

Horsman, Reginald. Race and Manifest Destiny the Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1981.

Johannsen, Roberet W. To the Halls of Montezuma: The Mexican War in the American Imagination. New York: Oxford, 1984.

Kastor, Peter J. The Louisiana Purchase: Emergence of an American Nation. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

Kennedy, Philip W. “Race and American Expansion in Cuba and Puerto Rico, 1895-1905.” Journal of Black Studies 1, no. 3 (1971): 306-16.

LaFeber, Walter. The New Empire: an Interpretation of American Expansion, 1860-1898. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1963.

Levinson, Sanford, and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion, 1803-1898. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

Libura, Krystyna, Luis Gerardo Morales Moreno y Jesús Velasco Márquez. Ecos de la guerra entre México y los Estados Unidos. México, D.F.: Ediciones Tecolote, 2004.

Love, Eric Tyrone Lowery. Race over Empire Racism and U.S. Imperialism, 1865-1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

May, Ernest R. Imperial Democracy the Emergence of America as a Great Power.  New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1961.

Merk, Frederick. Manifest Destiny and Mission in American History a Reinterpretation. 1st ed.  New York: Knopf, 1963.

Morgan, H. Wayne. America’s Road to Empire the War with Spain and Overseas Expansion. New York: Wiley, 1965.

Offner, John L. An Unwanted War the Diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992.

Pérez, Louis A. The War of 1898 the United States and Cuba in History and Historiography. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Picó, Fernando. 1898–La guerra después de la guerra.  Río Piedras: Ediciones Huracán, 1987.

Pratt, Julius W. Expansionist of 1898; the Acquisition of Hawaii and the Spanish Islands. Baltimore: John Hopkins Press, 1936.

Rickover, Hyman George. How the Battleship Maine Was Destroyed. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1994.

Robinson, Cecil. The View from Chapultepec: Mexican Writers on the Mexican-American War. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1989.

Rodríguez Beruff, Jorge. “Cultura y Geopolítica: Un acercamiento a la visión de Alfred Thayer Mahan sobre el Caribe.” Op. Cit. Revista del Centro Investigaciones Históricas 11 (1999): 173-89.

Schirmer, Daniel B. Republic or Empire American Resistance to the Philippine War. Cambridge, Mass: Schenkman Pub. Co., 1972.

Smith, Joseph. “The ‘Splendid Little War’ of 1898: a Reappraisal.” History 80, no. 258 (1995): 22-37.

Stephanson, Anders. Manifest Destiny American Expansionism and the Empire of Right. 1st ed. New York: Hill and Wang, 1995.

Torruella, Juan R. Global Intrigues: The Era of the Spanish-American War and the Rise of the United States to World Power. San Juan, P.R.: Editorial Universidad de Puerto Rico, 2006.

Vázquez, Josefina Zoraida. México al tiempo de su guerra con Estados Unidos, 1846-1848. México: Secretaría de Exteriores, El Colegio de México, Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1997.

Wegner, Dana, “New Interpretations of How the Maine was Lost,” en  Edward J. Marolda Theodore Roosevelt, the U.S. Navy, and the Spanish-American War. New York: Palgrave, 2001, pp. 7-17.

Welch, Richard W. Response to Imperialism.  The United States and the Philippine-American War, 1899-1902. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1979.

Weston, Rubin Francis. Racism in U.S. Imperialism the Influence of Racial Assumptions on American Foreign Policy, 1893-1946. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1972.

Zea, Leopoldo, y Adalberto Santana. El 98 y su impacto en Latinoamérica. México: Instituto Panamericano de Geografía e Historia : Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2001.

Wexley, Laura. Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U. S. Imperialism. Chapell Hill & London: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Williams, William Appleman. The Roots of the Modern American Empire. A Study of the Growth and Shaping of Social Consciousness in a Market Place Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1969.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Seguir

Recibe cada nueva publicación en tu buzón de correo electrónico.

Únete a otros 967 seguidores